Posts in In The Fold
In The Fold: An Interview with ceramicist Lauren HB
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Threefold Gifts makers are spread across the nation. What some don’t know is that a small handful of our artists are actively creating the gifts in our shop just blocks away from our front steps. Lauren Herzak-Bauman is one of those artists. Operating out of the Lake Erie Screw Factory, Lauren creates her geometric vessels, sculptural installations, and standalone structures in Lakewood’s well-known artist enclave.

Lauren Herzak-Bauman’s artistic practice fills homes with gorgeous, jewel-tone dishes, vases, and bowls, but her talents cannot be contained in just one space. Recently, her sculptural work and installations have been on display at the American Greetings corporate headquarters gallery, Cleveland Public Library’s Eastman Reading Garden, SPACES Gallery, The Westin Hotel in downtown Cleveland, and at MetroHealth Medical center in Brecksville.

Enjoy our interview with Lauren below, and shop a selection of her handmade goods at Threefold Gifts year-round.


How did you decide on your business name?

My business is Lauren HB Studio. I wanted to keep it simple but differentiate my functional work from my sculptural work (which I make under my full name, Lauren Herzak-Bauman). HB stands for my last name initials, but it’s really fun to let people guess!

What caused you to start making your products?

I fell in love with clay at a young age, before I could drive. However, I returned to making pots out of necessity. I was moving back to Cleveland without a job and I heard about this little thing called the Cleveland Flea (this was 2013) and I thought I’d apply and see if I could sell pots there. It went really well so I ran with it!

Can you tell us a little about the making of your products?

My pottery is slipcast, which means it’s produced in a mold using liquid clay, or slip. I design originals and take molds from them. Then slip is poured into the mold and a clay skin develops. When the slip gets poured out, the skin stays and become the pot! I fire everything in an electric kiln in my studio with handcrafted glazes. Every pot goes through at least two firings. Everything else I make depends on the concept and the context. I’m working outside of clay a lot for public art projects, which is fun and challenging.

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Who's on your our creative team?

I work with an awesome group of interns and assistants that help me manage all aspects of my business. My team changes seasonally but my assistant Meghan Calvert has been with me for almost three years!

Where do you create your work? What is that space like?

I make most of my work in my studio at the Screw Factory, located just around the corner from Threefold. The building is an old electric automobile factory (did you know that Cleveland was a leader in electric cars at the turn of the century?!) and the building has tall ceilings and big windows that let in the best light. I’m surrounded by other small businesses, artists, and an awesome facility and maintenance team. The Screw Factory is really the best studio building I’ve ever been a part of! I also have a small studio in my basement and a home office. But all my computer work happens on my couch in the living room.

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How often do you find yourself in the studio?

I’m in the studio very regularly four weekdays a week. I’m a new mom so I find myself coming in on weekends and evenings too. Some projects allow me to work from home, but most happens at the Screw Factory. I’m pretty messy so it’s best to keep that mess consolidated.

What is your favorite way to creatively warm-up?

Ahh such a good question! This changes all the time. Sometimes it’s sketching. Sometimes it’s making prototypes and maquettes. Other times it’s cleaning the studio, looking through old sketchbooks. One of my favorite things to do is to get outside and take pictures of surfaces, textures, and other abstract things that catch my eye. When I’m writing I turn on movies/tv shows I’ve seen a million times so I can zone out and get to the work. My everyday warm up includes copious amounts of coffee.

Share a little about your average day of work.

There’s a lot of repetitive labor in my studio practice, such as pouring molds, glazing pots, and loading and unloading kilns.  I try to break that up with some more on-my-feet physical activity like recycling clay, making glazes, or packing shipments. I work on problem solving tasks before lunch and save mindless grunt work for the end of the day. What I like about my studio practice is there really is no average day. Some days we are glazing pots, some days we are pouring resin on 10 ft. sculptures, and even other days we are installing artwork at gallery exhibitions. It keeps the workdays super fun!

Which part of your process do you get the most satisfaction from?

I really really love the design process. It’s hard but extremely satisfying to start with nothing in front of you and build prototypes to produce in clay. I also love unloading kilns with freshly glazed work, especially when the pots are still warm! It’s like Christmas at every kiln unloading.

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Do you have a favorite tool or technique that you love/can't do without?

I have way too many tools that I love to use all the time, but the biggest life-saving tool has been my Klein Tools Non-Contact Voltage Tester. I was once shocked touching a kiln and now I never touch a kiln without using my voltage tester first.

What do you like to listen to while you’re working?

Podcasts, music, movies, and TV. I switch it up a lot. Mortified is my current favorite podcast.

What is something that you wish people knew about you/ your business/ your products?

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That my practice is multi-faceted; I make sculptures, installations, public and private commissions, and public art. I really really love what I do and what I make. I hear from young people all the time that they love making things but they’re scared to pursue it as a profession. My advice is to pursue your passion ruthlessly.

If you could outsource any part of your current process, what task would that be and why?

I would love to outsource marketing! As an artist business owner, I wear a lot of hats and need to know how to do a little bit of everything. But I would so love for someone to take over this aspect of my business so I can focus on the work.

How do you see your work or processes changing in the near future?

I continue to find ways to make my business more efficient. I plan to work smarter, not harder! I also see custom and commission work growing. This is exciting as I love to design. I would love to art direct the functional side of my business and keep my hands in the sculptural side.

Which season is the most difficult for you, sales-wise? When is your busiest? How do you handle those highs and lows?

Since going wholesale, the flow of my business has really changed. My busy seasons are February-April and September-November, which coincides with sending new work to retail stores around the country as they stock up for tourist/holiday season. The traditional holiday buying season has become much more balanced for me and surprisingly I’m taking time to enjoy this time of the year. Summer months tend to be a difficult time sales wise. People seem to spend more money on experiences than objects at this time of year.

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What motivates you to do what you do?

What doesn’t?! My dad told me once I had an issue with authority. I now see he’s right. My main motivation for self-employment is to be able to do the things I want, with the people I like, in the places I like, when I want to do them. And I love making things, and I love being around other people who make things, and I love to work, and I love my studio, and I love the places I get to make art outside of my studio. So work makes work. The love for it drives the motivation and the motivation drives the work.

Who has had the greatest impression on you as an entrepreneur?

My dad and my grampa and my mother. My grandfather quit working for the man halfway through his life to open his own framing business. He put his entire life savings into it and retired with a good nest egg for himself and my gram. And they lived happily and comfortably and peacefully. My dad was very motivated to take care of his family and made his business work for him. He adapted some really great techniques to the sales industry that put him in a great place. He’s always strategizing with me on how to grow my business, encouraging me to think big. My mother too! She started a non-profit art center when I was 10. She just went after it! And after that she started her own framing business. She just did it without question. She’s so cool!  I wouldn’t be where I am without these people.

Are there any specific makers or creators in general who you think our readers should be paying attention to? What do those people mean to you?

Sometimes I think we need to turn our attention away from the influencer culture and focus more on the inspiration behind art, artists, and products. Influencers are awesome, but trendy, and focus shifts quickly from product to product, and season to season. To that end, I’m spending a lot of time looking at Nasa and National Geographic on Instagram. National Geographic spends time talking about how messed up our planet is and I think we all need to let that sink in more and think about how we can make a better/smaller/greener impact.

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What is your favorite thing about running your own business?

The variation in my daily routine, working with awesome interns/assistants, the creative freedom I enjoy in my personal and professional life.

Let’s say that you find some spare time in your schedule… what do you like to do when you aren’t working?

Momming is pretty high on my list of favorite things to do right now. It’s fun to rediscover the world through his eyes. But yoga is my other very favorite thing to do.

What advice would you give to future makers of all ages?

Take care of your body!


Shop a selection of LaurenHB ceramics at THREEFOLD Gifts, where you can find goods from over 50 national professional makers!
Visit us every Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-6pm at 13339 Madison Ave. in Lakewood, Ohio.

 
In the Fold: An Interview with Deanna Dionne of Cleveland Street Glass
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If you've ever visited Cleveland, you know how strangely high-contrast our neighborhoods can be... but that could be said for so many cities. Lush green parks vs. concrete jungles. What every city does not have is Cleveland's urban optimist, Deanna Dionne of Cleveland Street Glass. Life handed Deanna some lemons, and she went and grew an orchard from them. What we mean to say is, Deanna has found success in the frustration of living in the city. Her well known jewelry is the product of car break-ins and a heap of ingenuity. After her own car was broken into during her first week living on the north coast, she started a jewelry business and used the mess of her car insurance claim to spark her creativity. Better than a glass slipper, this fairy godmother clads Cleveland in glass earrings, pendants, rings, and cuffs.

We're proud to tell folks about all of our vendors, but we beam when we share Deanna's story. Read on for a true tale of one of Cleveland's most inventive makers.


How did you decide on your business' name?

In the beginning I toyed around with ‘artsy’ names like “Shatter” (yeah none of them were good) but my concept is already a bit “out there” and I realized I needed a simple name that would help people understand what they’re looking at. It’s a play off of “sea glass” except I’m finding glass in the street!

What caused you to start making your products?

Within a week of moving to Cleveland, my car was broken into. But I’d moved to this live/work artist’s loft downtown to pursue my art, so I was seeing art in everything. Soon the glass glittering on the streets from car break-ins looked like something I wanted to work with. Experiments lead to more experiments, and I settled on making jewelry. Creating brands was a big part of my previous job and I had all the skills to start my own business, so I did! And Cleveland has a lot of crazy opportunity and support, they responded in full! I feel like anything is possible here.

Can you tell us a little about the making of your products?

I sweep auto glass left over from car break-ins off city streets, and repurpose them into necklaces, earrings, and bracelets. I use a technique similar to stained glass, edging each individual piece with a silver alloy. Smaller pieces of glass are utilized by mixing with resin in custom shapes, handmade molds, or stainless steel charms.

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How often do you find yourself in the studio?

Basically 24/7! There are many days I do not leave the warehouse. I have found that I like working with resin in the morning, doing computer work/processing glass/ fulfilling orders during the day, and soldering at night.

Share a little about your average day of work

My work changes a lot day-to-day, which I really enjoy. I always hated routine. Usually if I have an event on the weekend, I’m spending the week making sure I have all the gaps in my inventory filled, and know exactly what I need for the event to be smooth and safe.

What is your favorite way to creatively warm-up? 

I usually spend Sundays recovering from Saturday events and find myself lying in my hammock sketching out ideas. At times when the ideas don’t come so easily, I always reference my sketchbook and can remember new techniques I wanted to try.

Where do you create your work? What is that space like?

I have a live/work space in downtown Cleveland. It’s a large open space where I carve out zones for different processes in my work, but any time I can do work on my couch, I will!

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What do you like to listen to while you’re working?

I love sappy rock ballads, heavy drum solos, bossa nova, and unique singers.

Who's on your our creative team?

I am a solo business, but love contracting help when I can, especially when friends are looking to pick up some extra work! I also love working with photographers for interesting photo shoots.

If you could outsource any part of your current process, what task would that be and why?

Listing items online is a challenge to keep up with, since all my pieces are one-of-a-kind, it’s a lot of work to photograph and measure every item and list them!

Which part of your process do you get the most satisfaction from?

There is a lot of process in my work. From finding the glass to sorting it, hardening it, preparing to solder, soldering, finishing/sanding… and finalizing the item. They’re each satisfying in their own way, and just having lots of different tasks to choose from is satisfying to me. But the most satisfaction I get is actually seeing people react to my work.

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What motivates you to do what you do?

When someone’s car is broken into, their glass is left for debris in the street. By collecting the glass, I’m able to reclaim it and add value back into it. I find it very empowering!

How do you see your work or processes changing in the near future?

I’ve started focusing more on my fine arts career. What I’ve learned through being creative with soldering and incorporating links, chain, and copper/bronze tubes have informed larger work in the form of sculptures. I feel super privileged that creating/selling wearable art is able to (occasionally) fund materials needed to create my fine art.

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What is something that you wish people knew about you/ your business/ your products?

Sometimes I’ve had people request an Ohio-shaped piece. However, I can’t make shapes out of this broken glass. I’m just using whatever shapes Chaos provided, and if I try manipulating the glass, it shatters! This is part of what I love, though. It guarantees everything is one-of-a-kind, contributes to the organic nature of the work, and is more of a collaboration between myself and the material.

Do you have a favorite tool or technique that you love/can't do without?

Discovering pipettes for applying resin was a game changer!

Which season is the most difficult for you, sales-wise? When is your busiest?How do you handle those highs and lows?

January through May there aren’t many events for me to sell my jewelry. I basically live off savings I’ve collected from the rest of the year, but also will pick up some freelance website design gigs. Then I get busier and busier until after December!

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Who has had the greatest impression on you as an entrepreneur?

My father. He raised 4 children running his upholstery shop from the home. He also made time for art, and I loved going to the art shows where he would sell his clay sculptures.

Are there any specific makers or creators in general who you think our readers should be paying attention to? What do those people mean to you?

Oh no, I could write a whole article just about this. I can’t pick just a few! OK OK I’ll try. These are all amazing Clevelanders who deserve a shout-out.

  • Matthew Gallagher - Matthew’s work explores generative processes, materiality, and physics. He has been a huge influence on the thought processes involved in my art, and I am always excited to see what he is working on. It helps that his studio is only 2 doors down from mine!

  • Aly Dodds with Furrow - Truly a woman of today. Her budding jewelry business is super modern, but she’s also a fantastic illustrator.

  • Kerie Johannes with Klub Kerie - I love how Kerie brings post-internet influence to ceramics. Watch out for this up-and-comer!

  • Jordan Wong - You’ve likely seen Jordan’s illustrations popping up all over Cleveland. In the past couple years he’s taken the local design community by storm!

  • Marcia Custer - Definitely pay attention to this one. Marcia is a performance artist and singer who is incredibly engaging in a fun, personable way. I can’t wait to see what she does next.

  • Ange Lupica of Sweet Teeth Confections - I quit sugar 3 months ago but I can’t quit looking at Ange’s amazing pastry creations! This woman works so hard and is so passionate. Very inspiring.

  • Alaina Caruso of The Home Pantry - If you’ve had jam at Cleveland Bagel Co., thank Alaina. I’m keeping an eye on The Home Pantry as I have a feeling it will be a very big deal soon.

Now my heart is full of thinking of all the amazing people in Cleveland I’ve been lucky to meet.

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What is your favorite thing about running your own business?

Setting my own schedule. I hate routine and have leaned hard into an intuitive lifestyle, which is really a luxury.

Let’s say that you find some spare time in your schedule… what do you like to do when you aren’t working?

I love to get coffee with friends or catch up with my neighbors.

What advice would you give to future makers of all ages?

Experiment with your work all the time! Learning and self-teaching should never stop.

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Shop a selection of Cleveland Street Glass jewelry at THREEFOLD Gifts, where you can find goods from 45 national professional makers!
Visit us every Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-6pm at 13339 Madison Ave. in Lakewood, Ohio.

 
In the Fold: An Interview with Rachel Aughtry of Rachel Elise
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THREEFOLD Gifts–as young as it is–has always had professional makers in-mind. We developed this business as a way to find more of a home in a world where we didn't have to compete with folks practicing the infamous side-hustle. Part of that reasoning is because we were surrounded by so amazing professional makers as young business owners in Texas. Rachel Aughtry was one of those makers.
We met Rachel at the beginning of her time as an entrepreneur nearly a decade ago, and we've been lucky enough to watch her handbag business, Rachel Elise, grow over the years. She and her husband, Bo, are great friends of ours. We relate on all of the important levels, business and non. We can't image better folks to introduce you to in our very first maker interview. 


How did you decide on your business name? It seems so personalized and friendly!
Our business name is Rachel Elise, which is my first and middle name. When I first started RE, I struggled with what to name it, so naming it after myself seemed simple enough. Also, my mom blessed me with a sweet name combo, so I figured I shouldn’t let that go to waste.

What caused you to start making bags?
I started the business when I was in college, studying art. I was in a zillion studio classes, but felt like all my “creative” projects were driven by deadlines and assignment parameters. I wanted to have a creative thing that something I simply wanted to do-- little did I know it would be my job (and my husband’s job!) ten years down the road.

Introduce us to your creative team!
It’s me and Bo, my husband. Plus the cats.

Where do you make your bags, and what's that space like?
Bo and I work from our home studio in Weaverville, North Carolina. Our house sits in the woodsy Blue Ridge Mountains, so we get to leave our windows open for natural light and free bird sounds. Our two cats hang out with us on the reg as well.

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How often do you find yourself in the studio?
We’re both full-timers, so we’re usually in the studio 8ish (or 9ish lol) to 5ish, Monday-Friday. We follow the Barbara Corcoran philosophy that taking a real weekend makes you a better human and a smarter worker.

Could you share a little about your average day of work?
My day is pretty much behind the sewing machine. We print together once or twice a week, but that usually just takes a couple of hours. Bo’s day varies a lot, but can include cutting fabrics, trimming threads (this seems like a ridiculous task, but trust me, it’s a thing), and shipping out orders.

What is your favorite way to creatively warm-up?
This is maybe the most boring answer ever, but organizing? (That’s such an non-artist answer, but I am what I am.) Making a to-do list or reorganizing materials gets me amped to tackle all the things and creates brainspace for the fun stuff.

Can you tell us a little about the making of your products?
If you insist! Bo cuts all our materials, I do most of the sewing/designing, and we tag-team screenprinting. Yes, we screenprint own our designs/fabrics because sewing them from scratch isn’t enough work on its own! ;-)

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What is something that you wish people knew about your business?
It’s a true team effort! I do most of our sewing, so sometimes people don’t understand the importance of Bo’s work for our buisness. But trust me, he’s a busy dude! There is so much more to a handmade business than just the obvious.

Which season is the most difficult for you, sales-wise? When is your busiest? How do you handle those highs and lows?
January to April-ish is our slow season. There’s a great appreciation for the art community in Western North Carolina, but a lot of that appreciation happens at craft fairs that start in May and go through the end of the year. But there always seem to be put-off projects for those early-in-the-year months!

How do you see your work or processes changing in the near future?
We already have some new materials in our possession that we’re super excited to include in our work later this year! But for now, it’s top secret.

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Which part of your process do you get the most satisfaction from?
Colors are my favorite! So combining new materials and fabrics is always the best.

If you could outsource any part of your current process, what task would you choose?
Making straps, hands down. Bo cuts them; I sew them. A lot of time and love goes into those suckers, and many of our customers don’t even realize it’s a component we make ourselves. But we do make them! With love! Even if we don’t love to make them ;-)

What motivates you to do what you do?
Being your own boss is an excellent lifestyle– you get to make what you want, when you want, can change it up when you need to, and can reward yourself with a break when you’ve earned it. I love to create and am so glad that’s my job, but maintaining autonomy is often the biggest motivator.

Do you have a favorite tool or technique that you love/can't do without?
My Juki industrial sewing machine is everything! Having the proper equipment to do what you need to do is imperative. But I also really really love the screenprinting process, partially hand-painting the screens. Swoon.

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Who has had the greatest impression on you as an entrepreneur?
My grandma. She owned a gift shop when I was a kid and has been a maker her whole life (though I don’t think she’d give herself credit for that). Her shop inspired me to also own a brick and mortar for a time, and her free spirit definitely encouraged me to go after what I really wanted in life.

What do you like to listen to while you’re working?
A mix of music, podcasts, and audiobooks. Thirty to forty hours of sewing a week is a lot of sewing-- you gotta mix it up! My favorite podcasts right now are 99% Invisible and Stuff You Should Know. And I also listen to a lot of politic garbage, but we don’t have to get into that ;-)

Let’s say that you find some spare time in your schedule… what do you like to do when you aren’t working?
Go outside! Bo and I are both native Texans but moved to WNC for the great outdoors. Hiking is definitely how we spend our weekends, and I try to spend some down time on our patio every day.

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Are there any specific makers or creators in general who you think our readers should be paying attention to?
Heck yeah! My friend Emile recently opened a brick and mortar workshop space called Wildflower Art Studio in Denton, Texas. I’ve known Emile for years and it’s been so cool to watch her develop Wildflower from a print/card company, to a series of workshops, to a DIY kit behemoth (seriously, she’s sold tens of thousands of art kits on Amazon), to running her own permanent workshop space with sold out classes. I love when makers can (seamingly) flow from one focus to another and still stay true to their mission and brand. It’s inspiring to see how people and businesses reshape over time.

What is your favorite thing about running your own business?
I love that I can change my schedule or what we’re making or how we’re making it just because I’m tired of doing it the old way. Flexibility is the best!

What advice would you give to future makers of all ages?
I JUST talked about flexibility in the last question, but seriously, be flexible! You aren’t locked in to one product or one style or one path. Change it organically as you see fit! Don’t limit yourself with too many rules. Rules are good (but so is breaking them!)

What’s one question that you wish we would have asked… and what is your answer to that question?
mmmmm maybe “What’s Bo’s nickname for himself in the studio?” The answer to which is Bo Elise.


Shop a selection of Rachel Elise bags at THREEFOLD Gifts, where you can find goods from 45 national professional makers!
Visit us every Tuesday-Saturday, 10am-6pm at 13339 Madison Ave. in Lakewood, Ohio.